Christmas Tip: 4. What kind of Christmas do you want?

Have you taken a little time to consider just what kind of a Christmas you would like to have. Or are you being propelled towards just another generic Christmas by all that advertising and shopping?

What kind of Christmas would you like to have? If you were having the perfect Christmas what would you see? What would you hear? How would you feel?. Getting a rich representation of how you want events to turn out is essential if you want to reach your outcome. It’s a large part of the NLP well formed outcome process.

Having a well-formed Christmas outcome might seem a little like business coaching gone mad, but if you are stuck with Christmas, and we do seem to be stuck with it, it might be worth spending a little time considering how you would like it to be. Having a well formed outcome gives your other than concious mind something to work towards.

Within the context of what and where you are likely to be this Christmas consider these questions.

What would you like to see at Christmas? A tree surrounded by presents? Happy smiling faces? A tropical beach flanked with palm trees? What would you see that would let you know you were enjoying an excellent Christmas.

What would you like to hear at Christmas? People wishing you well in a loving, happy tone of voice. The clink of glasses and buzz of friendly conversation? The crackle of logs in an open fire?

How about the feelings? Warm and friendly? Snug and curled up by the fire? Wrapped up against a cold wind on a frosty day?

What smells and tastes would you like? There are probably more smells and tastes available at Christmas than at any other time of year! The choice is yours.

Take a while to enjoy your Christmas in your imagination. It’s not only fun it’s preparing yourself for an enjoyable Christmas in reality. While dreaming of the Christmas you want probably won’t guarantee it will happen exactly as planned, giving your mind a direction will make it more likely. Having a clearer idea of what you want to happen makes it easier to take the necessary steps to get it.

On the other hand. If these questions prompt anxiety or other negative emotions, which can happen if life is being a bit unreasonable at the moment, then you could use this opportunity to work on some of those issues using EFT, NLP or your preferred self development method.

About Andy

6 Responses to “Christmas Tip: 4. What kind of Christmas do you want?”

Read below or add a comment...

  1. Sally Smith says:

    I actually tried this about a month ago when my husband and I were getting very anti about all the eating and slobbing about on Christmas Day. We sat down together and each put into the pot what we would like from Christmas. Very simple ideas like wanting to spend some time outdoors on Christmas Day, only wanting one meal instead of two huge ones, enjoying our time together instead of falling asleep in front of the telly.

    We have yet to see how it works but we have planned to walk in the local Nature park in the morning with my Mum and brother, possibly with hot soup and mince pies, then meet the in-laws in the afternoon/early evening for a meal.

    The best bit was how easily everyone else accepted the suggestions because we were coming from a better feeling place of what we wanted rather than what we didn’t want,

    Keep up the great articles

  2. Andy says:

    Thank you for your kind words.

    I was struck by you comment about everyone easily accepting the suggestions because you were stating what you wanted rather than what you didn’t.

    That hadn’t occurred to me before, but it makes perfect sense. It’s so much easier to respond to a suggestion based on a want than a don’t want. You can either go along with it or suggest an alternative that might be close enough to the original plan to fit in well. If you have to respond to a don’t want you might have to keep firing out suggestions till one fits. That might take a while.

    It brings to mind kids saying “I’m bored” a very high powered ‘don’t want’ but with very little guidance as where they would like to be.

    Thanks for the insight and have a very Cool Yule

  3. Sally Smith says:

    You will be pleased to hear that this worked perfectly. We had a fantastic walk and the rain held off for the whole time. (I had been visualising a dry walk). The light picnic worked a treat and then for the first time in my life I was actually hungry for Christmas Dinner at 5 (ish).

    Even when the gravy was spilt and the parsnips were not quite cooked, it wasn’t the calamity that it would have been in previous years.

    These techniques really work!

    Now for New Year 😉

  4. Andy says:

    Glad the day went well, parsnips and gravy notwithstanding.

    I have to say I don’t think we can claim to adjust the weather by our thinking. If that were so, given our weather, Britain would have some people with strange thought processes … hmm … now that I think about it 🙂

    Good luck with the New Year.

  5. Sally Smith says:

    It may be that my visualisation did nothing to the weather but in my experience there are actually very few days when I particularly desire to do something, that the weather is not fine enough to do it. I think that we as a nation have a much worse perception of our weather than it actually is, probably in part due to the forecasters trying to cover every eventuality so that they won’t get caught out.

    To me it often seems that using gratitude and Law of Attraction is actually recognising the good that is already happening and appreciating it, as attracting something that was different to what was occurring anyway. I hope that is clear?

  6. Andy says:

    I think you are right about our perceptions of the weather (and other things).

    In my opinion the trick is to enjoy or at least accept whatever is going on. If your happiness is dependent on external circumstances then you are at the beck and call of external circumstances.

    Perhaps the Law of Attraction should be called the Law of Attention.

Leave a Reply